Last edited by Zulkigore
Friday, July 31, 2020 | History

8 edition of Betel chewing traditions in South-East Asia found in the catalog.

Betel chewing traditions in South-East Asia

by Dawn Rooney

  • 138 Want to read
  • 17 Currently reading

Published by Oxford University Press in Kuala Lumpur, New York .
Written in English

    Places:
  • Southeast Asia,
  • Southeast Asia.
    • Subjects:
    • Betel chewing -- Southeast Asia -- History,
    • Betel nut -- Southeast Asia -- Folklore,
    • Decoration and ornament -- Southeast Asia,
    • Southeast Asia -- Social life and customs

    • Edition Notes

      Includes bibliographical references (p. 69-73) and index.

      StatementDawn F. Rooney.
      SeriesImages of Asia
      Classifications
      LC ClassificationsGT3015 .R66 1993
      The Physical Object
      Paginationxi, 76 p. :
      Number of Pages76
      ID Numbers
      Open LibraryOL1393255M
      ISBN 100195886208
      LC Control Number93000400

      Betel chewing is still a common custom throughout Southeast Asia and has the same geographic distribution as the custom of filing and blackening the teeth. Indeed chewing betel does affect the coloring of the teeth but it conveys an irregular brown color instead of the lustrous black seen in Vietnamese who have had their teeth lacquered. Paan (from Sanskrit parṇá "leaf"; cognate with English fern) is a preparation combining betel leaf with areca nut widely consumed throughout Southeast Asia, East Asia (mainly Taiwan) and South is chewed for its stimulant and psychoactive effects. After chewing, it is either spat out or swallowed. Paan has many variations. Slaked lime (chuna) paste is commonly added to bind the leaves.

      Silver-Inlaid Brass Betel Box (Lutuan) Islamic Mindanao, the Philippines early 20th century length: 27cm, width: 12cm, height: 14cm, weight: approx. 6kg Betel chewing was prevalent in the southern Philippines as in much of the rest of Southeast Asia. Wealthier Maranao families on Mindanao were able to afford elaborate silver-inlaid brass betel boxes such as this Read more. This is one of the largest such betel boxes, known locally as a lutuan, that we have seen. Betel chewing was prevalent in the southern Philippines as in much of the rest of Southeast Asia. Wealthier Maranao families on Mindanao were able to afford elaborate silver-inlaid brass betel boxes such as this large example. Such Read more.

      Trau Cau / Betel and Areca (Vietnamese Culture: Frequently Asked Questions) [Huu Ngoc, Lady Borton] on *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers. Trau Cau / Betel and Areca (Vietnamese Culture: Frequently Asked Questions)Format: Paperback. The most splendid of all boxes made in Asia are those that held the most common thing: betel-nuts, also known as Sirih in Indonesia. ZEBREGS&RÖELL FINE ART - ANTIQUES. Please note that opening times may vary at the moment.


Share this book
You might also like
Advances in understanding international peacemaking.

Advances in understanding international peacemaking.

house of pomegranates.

house of pomegranates.

Johannes Brahms

Johannes Brahms

Palestine and the other Israel

Palestine and the other Israel

tourism development handbook

tourism development handbook

Probability of detecting atrazine/desethyl-atrazine and elevated concentrations of nitrate in ground water in Colorado

Probability of detecting atrazine/desethyl-atrazine and elevated concentrations of nitrate in ground water in Colorado

Special edition.

Special edition.

A-Z street atlas of Derby and district.

A-Z street atlas of Derby and district.

Evaluation of K-12 career education

Evaluation of K-12 career education

Oden und Epigramme

Oden und Epigramme

Sibelius and his world.

Sibelius and his world.

Validating certain conveyances made by Central Pacific Railway Co., in the Counties of San Joaquin and Sacramento, Calif.

Validating certain conveyances made by Central Pacific Railway Co., in the Counties of San Joaquin and Sacramento, Calif.

Wayside songs with other verse.

Wayside songs with other verse.

State academies for the academically gifted

State academies for the academically gifted

Wills, trusts, and estates administration

Wills, trusts, and estates administration

looking-glass for Elder Clarke and Elder Wightman, and the church under their care

looking-glass for Elder Clarke and Elder Wightman, and the church under their care

Betel chewing traditions in South-East Asia by Dawn Rooney Download PDF EPUB FB2

The boundaries extend to the eastern coastline of Africa to Madagascar in the West; Melanesia to Tikopia (in the Santa Cruz Islands) in the East; southern China in the North, and Papua New Guinea in the South [see map in book, Betel Chewing Traditions in South-East Asia, p.l 1]. Betel chewing is firmly embedded in the traditions of South-East.

Betel chewing is one of the most ancient and widespread traditions of the peoples of South-East Asia, and encompasses an estimated one-tenth of the world's population. Although the ingredients of the betel quid are indigenous, the habit was probably introduced to the region by traders and merchants from India some 2, years ago.5/5(1).

Betel Chewing Traditions in South-East Asia 12 1 The Tradition FEW traditions in South-East Asia have the antiquity and universal acceptance of betel chewing. The custom is over 2, years old and has survived from ancient times into the twentieth century.

Its. Betel chewing traditions in South-East Asia. Kuala Lumpur ; New York: Oxford University Press, (OCoLC) Online version: Rooney, Dawn. Betel chewing traditions in South-East Asia. Kuala Lumpur ; New York: Oxford University Press, (OCoLC) Document Type: Book: All Authors / Contributors: Dawn Rooney.

The betel nut, officially known as the areca catechu, comes from the areca thrives in different parts of Asia, including the Philippines, India, and Japan.

This tree grows year-round, and it is believed that people began chewing on this nut as early as B.C. Abstract. There remains a historical puzzle concerning the sudden collapse in the popularity of betel chewing in Southeast Asia.

A custom that was addictive, and that had become deeply entrenched in local culture over millennia, all but vanished with remarkable speed. Cairns woman Aore Groves says it's unfair to ban betel nut in Australia when tobacco is widely consumed.(ABC Far North: Marian Faa)The tropical nut is chewed widely across South-East Asia.

Betel leaf and Areca nuts symbolize loyalty and strong bond. Symbol of marriage and love According to the traditions in many South-East Asian countries, a combination of Betel leaf and Areca nuts is inseparable as they symbolize loyalty in love and a strong bond.

Thus, it became a tradition to chew a betel leaf and Areca nut when the bride and groom’s parents talk about their wedding plans. According to Dawn Rooney, author of the book ‘Betel Chewing Traditions in South-East Asia’ (), “the earliest archaeological evidence found so far is at Spirit Cave in north-western Thailand, where remains of Areca catechu (beetle nut or palm), dating f BC have been found.”.

Betel chewing was known in the colonial days as betel-nut chewing. 1 The art of paan or betel chewing dates back to the pre-Vedic Saivite Harappan empire, 2 and the activity is also known as makan sireh in Malaysia and Singapore. 3 It requires three different plants used in combination: the betel nut which is the seed of the areca palm, 4 the betel leaf which comes from the pan plant, and lime.

Dawn Rooney in Betel Chewing Traditions in South-East Asia(page 55) quotes a European diplomat in after a dinner hosted by the Governor of Siem Reap, ‘there was music and dancing and then the Governor exhibited his betel-boxes and other paraphernalia Articles included a little silver box containing a perfumed ointment, used by the.

An illustration of an open book. Books. An illustration of two cells of a film strip. Video. An illustration of an audio speaker. Audio An illustration of a " floppy disk. Betel chewing traditions in South-East Asia by Rooney, Dawn. Publication date Topics Betel chewing, Betel nut, Decoration and ornament Publisher.

In conclusion, the present meta-analysis of observational studies from South-East Asia shows that the smoking-drinking-betel quid chewing interaction has the power to increase the oral cancer risk by twenty-three to thirty-four times and such an interaction is responsible for more than two thirds (i.e., >40,) oral cancer cases that occur in.

When dining with elders in South-east Asia, it is customary to wait for them to start eating first before you tuck into your meal; this is a sign of respect. You can also politely ask them to begin eating.

How to blend in around South-east Asia. Keep an eye out for these country-specific social customs and quirks to mingle effortlessly with locals. It is widely popular around the Pacific countries and South and South-East Asia. The way it is consumed varies from place to place.

In China for example, where it is known as binglang (槟榔), it is first cooked before being bagged and sold to consumers. In India and Sri Lanka, it was consumed together with betel. Oral cancer is the second most form of cancer and cause of death among men living in South-East Asia.

Globally one third of cancer cases are of oral cancer and one half from the South-East Asian region. One of the important factors contributing to this is the use of betel quid and tobacco [17]. In many countries in South East Asia, the betel chewing tradition has decreased or you can find it only in villages.

It is the case of Thailand or Bangladesh. I heard that in Bangkok some years ago they introduced fines for people spitting the betel juice in public spaces. In comparison with a study, which observed that % of men chewed betel quid with tobacco, we found that % of men chewed betel quid with tobacco Use of chewing tobacco is –3 times higher in rural areas of Bangladesh in comparison with urban areas,14 and it is possible that our results may reflect slightly higher betel quid.

The Betel Tradition. Through November 30th, Asia Collection Fourth Floor, Hamilton Library Curator/Designer: Chintana Takahashi The custom of betel-chewing is the most important single cultural phenomenon that extends across a large body of peoples who.

I love this question because I read a beautiful history book by Professor Anthony Reid entitled “Southeast Asia in the Age of Commerce, Volume One: The Lands below the Winds”.

It is one of my favorite history books. It illustrates a bus. Malay culture and tradition hold betel nut and betel leaves in high esteem, evident through their use in many social and religious ceremonies.

In an Assamese marriage they are conspicuously.Preparing Betel nut in a pupulu leaf. Food Facts. Where: Chewed in many parts of Asia Taste: Bitter and acidic – an acquired taste Health: Rich in tannins but is now linked to mouth cancer in parts of Asia. Serving Suggestion: Wrap in a peppery pupulu leaf and chew until fully stimulated (or sick!) Betel nut is the fruit of the Areca tree, a wiry coconut palm which grows in moist ground in.The betel (Piper betle) is a vine of the family Piperaceae, which includes pepper and kava.

Betel leaf is mostly consumed in Asia, and elsewhere in the world by some Asian emigrants, as betel quid or in paan, with Areca nut and/or tobacco. In India and Sri Lanka, a sheaf of betel leaves is traditionally offered as a mark of respect and auspicious beginnings.